January 25th marks the 182nd anniversary of the official flag of Texas, the Lone Star Flag.


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The Texas flag, also known as the Lone Star Flag, was adopted on this day (Jan 25) in 1839, then known as the Republic of Texas. In turn, the Lone Star Flag gave Texas its nickname of the Lone Star State.

Being Texas Proud means so many things to us fellow Texans, and our flag is a symbol of our proud heritage. Here's a fact you may not know. Along with the flag of Hawaii, it is one of two state flags to have previously served as a national flag. When Texas became the 28th state in 1845, our national flag officially became our state flag.

The Lone Star Flag was also ranked the #2 flag, behind New Mexico, in a North American Vexillological Association survey in 2001. I'm sure they'd vote the same today with the Lone Star Flag maybe even grabbing the top spot.

Nobody's really sure who designed the Lone Star flag, although some think it might have been Charles B. Stewart of Montgomery, Texas.

And just to debunk an urban legend, it's not true that the Lone Star Flag is the only flag allowed to fly at the same height as the United States flag. In fact, according to the United States Flag Code, any state can fly their flag at the same height as the U.S. flag, but the U.S. flag should be on its right (the viewer's left).

Check out this video for some more history of the Texas Lone Star Flag.



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